Tag Archives: architecture

Abuhav Synagogue in Safed – Sephardi Synagogue with Ancient Torah Scroll

The “Great Synagogue” of Safed was built in the 16th century for the Sephardic Jews of the town. It was destroyed in the earthquake of 1759. Only the ancient torah scroll, which tradition says was written by the 15th century scholar Rabbi Yitzchak Abuhav survived.

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Israel Supreme Court Building in Jerusalem – Supreme Court Architecture

Israel’s Supreme Court Building was built by architects Ram Karmi and Ada Karmi-Melamed. The building was opened in 1992; previously rented premises were used for the court. The building was donated by Dorothy de Rothschild; pictures of the architects and letters from Rothschild can be viewed in the Court building.

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Israel Museum – Dead Sea scrolls, art, and archaeology in the Israel Museum

The Israel Museum, located in Jerusalem, was founded in 1965 as the national museum. The museum has collections of art, archaeology, and Judaica. The museum has a youth wing, a display of Jerusalem during the second temple period, and a display of the Dead Sea scrolls.

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Tel Aviv’s First City Hall – photographs and videos from old Tel Aviv

The Museum of the History of Tel-Aviv-Jaffa is located in the first city hall, known as Beit Ha’Ir. The museum, which opened in the end of 2009, displays photographs collected from the residents of Tel Aviv and old video clips. The office of Meir Dizengoff is also on display inside.

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Naharayim Hydroelectricity Station designed by Pinchas Rotenberg – Israel Electric Company’s first power station

Naharayim is best known as the island of peace. In addition to being the site of the signing of the Jordanian-Israeli peace treaty, it is also the site of the first electricity plant built by the Israel Electric Company in the 1920s.

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Walking tour of Mishkenot Sha’ananim and Yemin Moshe – walking tour outside the old city

By the mid 19th century, about 15,000 Jews, Muslims and Christians lived in the old city of Jerusalem; about a third of the residents were Jews. Despite the overcrowding conditions, the poverty and filth, the residents of the city were unwilling to leave the holy city. The area around the city was filled with marauders and thieves, as well as wild animals. The gates of the old city were locked at sunset each day and opened only at sunrise, thus protecting the inhabitants of the city.

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Jerusalem Archaeological Park – Davidson Center in Jerusalem’s old city

The Jerusalem Archaeological Park includes the southern section of the western wall as well as the southern retaining wall of the temple mount, in addition to the excavations alongside these walls. The Davidson Center, located in an ancient Umayyad palace, has a museum which provides additional information, displays, and context for the archaeological garden.

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