Tag Archives: biblical site

Mount Gerizim National Park – Har Grizim Archaeological Site

When the Israelites entered the land, after the exodus from Egypt, Joshua led them here for the ceremony of the blessing and the curse (Deuteronomy 11:29). Mount Gerizim was the mountain of the blessing; from the site, you can see Mount Ebal, the mountain of the curse, on the other side of the city of Shechem (Nablus).

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Ein Evrona Well – Avrona Farmstead and Doum Palms near Eilat

Avrona, or Evrona, was an old farming village near Eilat from the 7th-9th centuries. The inhabitants were able to farm the area due to the underground spring nearby. A deep well was dug, and tunnels carried the water by gravitation to the cultivated fields. The runoff from the rains in the Eilat mountains was also captured by the village inhabitants.

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Tel Azeka in the Valley of Elah – David and Goliath’s battle in the Valley of Elah

Azeka was a biblical town in the heights above the Valley of Elah, in the region given to the tribe of Judah. David fought and conquered the Philistine Goliath in the Valley of Elah. Tel Azeka is located in Park Britannia; from the tel you can see the Valley of Elah where the famous battle took place.

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Jewish Quarter walking tour – Walking tour from the Jaffa Gate to the Western Wall

The Jewish Quarter was rebuilt after the six day war. Reconstruction of the Jewish Quarter took place from 1969-1985, at the end of which 600 Jewish families were housed there; the reconstruction included excavations and archeological digs, as well as building modern homes and institutions. This tour winds through the Northern part of the Jewish Quarter, taking you through the ancient sites and new buildings.

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King Solomon’s Quarries – quarries in Jerusalem cave – Zedekiah’s Cave

Zedekiah’s cave, called Ma’arat Tzedekiyahu in Hebrew, is one of the largest caves in Israel. The cave is about 220 meters long, and lies under the Moslem quarter. The cave was blocked in the 11th century, and only rediscovered in 1854, when an American missionary discovered it by chance. The entrance to the cave is through the park by the Damascus Gate.

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