Tag Archives: Jerusalem

Hike in Upper Nahal Og – Very challenging hike in the Judean Desert

This hike in Nahal Og bears no resemblance to the classic lower Nahal Og hike with the three waterfalls. This is probably the most “technically” difficult hike I have ever done, with a number of spots where my fellow hikers had to help each other. Having said that, it was amazing and great fun – but it should not be attempted alone or by inexperienced hikers.

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Zechariah’s tomb in the Kidron Valley – Monument for Zecharia the priest

Zechariah’s tomb in the Kidron Valley is associated with Zecharia son of the priest Jehoiada. According to the Book of Chronicles (Divrei HaYamim), he was stoned at the behest of King Yoash of Judah when Zechariah berated the Jews for not following God’s commandments. Zechariah lived in the 9th century BCE, during the first temple period.

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Knesset Menorah – Seven branched candelabra by the Israel Knesset

The Knesset Menorah is located opposite the Knesset building in the Rose Garden. The menorah was designed by Benno Elkan; it is a seven branched candelabra like the menorah from the ancient temple. The six branches on the outside depict the struggles of the Jewish people in the Diaspora, while the center branch depicts the history of the Jews since the establishment of the state of Israel.

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Israel Supreme Court Building in Jerusalem – Supreme Court Architecture

Israel’s Supreme Court Building was built by architects Ram Karmi and Ada Karmi-Melamed. The building was opened in 1992; previously rented premises were used for the court. The building was donated by Dorothy de Rothschild; pictures of the architects and letters from Rothschild can be viewed in the Court building.

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Connecting Path from Yad VaShem to Har Herzl – Path from Holocaust to New State

The connecting path between Yad VaShem and Har Herzl brings us from the years after the Holocaust to the creation of the state of Israel. The path, which is an easy stroll, is marked by historical signs which explain the major Jewish events leading up to the state. One of the markers, depicting the declaration of Independence, includes a recording of Ben Gurion’s famous speech. Later markers show the Arab attacks on Israel immediately afterwards.

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Memorial for Ethiopian Jews who died en route to Israel – Memorial for Ethiopian Jews on Har Herzl

The Jews of Ethiopia dreamed of coming to Israel for generations. This was finally possible in the early 1980s, although at the risk of their lives. In order to get to Israel, the Ethiopian Jews needed to get to Sudan, where they were airlifted to Israel in Operation Moses in 1984.

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Ancient Burnt House in Jerusalem – Katres House in Jerusalem

The burnt house, also known as Katres House, is the excavated remains of a house in the Jewish quarter of Jerusalem which was destroyed at the time of the destruction of the second temple. The house is believed to have been owned by a priestly family.

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Yad VaShem Museum Complex – Yad VaShem Holocaust Museum

Yad Vashem is Israel’s official Holocaust Museum. The original museum was established in 1953. The museum complex contains the holocaust history museum, hall of remembrance, museum of holocaust art, children’s memorial, and a research institute. Yad VaShem’s goals include education, documentation, commemoration, and research of the Holocaust.

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Shmuel HaNavi’s tomb in Israel – Samuel the Prophets tomb at Nabi Samuel

The grave of Shmuel HaNavi, known in Arabic as Nabi Samuel, is located just north of Jerusalem. While some question whether this is really the grave site of Samuel the prophet, Jewish tradition dating back to the middle ages holds that this is his tomb.

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Ramparts Walk National Park – Jerusalem’s old city ramparts

The ramparts walk along the top of Jerusalem’s old city walls provides a new view into parts of the old city which are otherwise inaccessible, and a view into the lives of the inhabitants of the old city. The views from the walls of the old city as well as the new city are spectacular.

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Israel Museum – Dead Sea scrolls, art, and archaeology in the Israel Museum

The Israel Museum, located in Jerusalem, was founded in 1965 as the national museum. The museum has collections of art, archaeology, and Judaica. The museum has a youth wing, a display of Jerusalem during the second temple period, and a display of the Dead Sea scrolls.

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L. A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art – watch collection, art, and history in museum of Islamic Art

The L. A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art was founded by philanthropist Vera Bryce Salomons. It was founded in memory of her friend and teacher, Professor Leo Aryeh Mayer, rector of the Hebrew University and a scholar of Islamic art. The museum opened to the public in 1974.

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Jerusalem Biblical Zoo – Tisch Family Zoological Gardens

The Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem, officially known as the Tisch Family Zoological Gardens, was originally opened in 1928 by Aharon Shulov of Hebrew University. The Zoo was a small children’s zoo at that time, in the center of Jerusalem. In 1947, the zoo moved to the Hebrew University on Mount Scopus (Har HaTzofim, in Hebrew). The animals were traumatized by the shelling during the War of Independence in 1948, so they were moved once again to the Ezrat Torah neighborhood. The zoo remained there from 1950 to 1991; over time the zoo became dilapidated and overcrowded. In 1991, the zoo was closed and reopened in 1993 in the Malha neighborhood.

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Shuk Machane Yehuda – Mahane Yehuda Market in Jerusalem

Mahane Yehuda Market, known in Hebrew as Shuk Mahane Yehuda, is the main outdoor fresh food marketplace in Jerusalem. Aside from the fresh fruits and vegetables, bread, cheese, fish, meat, and spices, you can also purchase houseware and clothing. The market has recently attracted some upscale shops and restaurants as well.

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Lifeline for the Old – Yad LaKashish workshops for the elderly

Lifeline for the Old (Yad Le’Kashish in Hebrew) provides employment to the impoverished elderly in Jerusalem. Many of the impoverished elderly are immigrants who have no savings from their working years. Although often they are educated people, they have no skills which could provide them with income after retirement. Yad La’Kashish provides them with jobs as well as a social framework.

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Ammunition Hill Museum and Memorial – Givat HaTachmoshet Museum

Ammunition Hill, known as Givat HaTachmoshet in Hebrew, was the most heavily fortified Jordanian stronghold in 1967. It was also the site of one of the fiercest battles during the six day war. When the Israeli paratroopers captured the hill, the liberation of the old city of Jerusalem was possible.

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Herodian Quarter – Herodian archaeological museum – Wohl Archaeological Museum in Jerusalem

The Herodian Quarter, which is the largest roofed archaeological site in Israel, encompasses over 2700 square meters and the remains of 6-7 large houses from the second temple period. When the Jewish quarter was rebuilt from 1969-1982, the remains of second temple period homes were found at the site of the Yeshivat HaKotel building. Photographs of the excavations can be seen in the museum.

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German Hospice – St. Mary’s crusader hospice – Crusader Church

The Crusader Church was first built during the 12th century when Jerusalem was under Crusader rule. The hospice was run by the Teutonic Church and the Order of the Teutonic Knights. The hospice was known as St Mary’s of the German Knights, and was used to care for the sick crusaders who arrived in Jerusalem.

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Jewish Quarter walking tour – Walking tour from the Jaffa Gate to the Western Wall

The Jewish Quarter was rebuilt after the six day war. Reconstruction of the Jewish Quarter took place from 1969-1985, at the end of which 600 Jewish families were housed there; the reconstruction included excavations and archeological digs, as well as building modern homes and institutions. This tour winds through the Northern part of the Jewish Quarter, taking you through the ancient sites and new buildings.

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King Solomon’s Quarries – quarries in Jerusalem cave – Zedekiah’s Cave

Zedekiah’s cave, called Ma’arat Tzedekiyahu in Hebrew, is one of the largest caves in Israel. The cave is about 220 meters long, and lies under the Moslem quarter. The cave was blocked in the 11th century, and only rediscovered in 1854, when an American missionary discovered it by chance. The entrance to the cave is through the park by the Damascus Gate.

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Walking tour of Mishkenot Sha’ananim and Yemin Moshe – walking tour outside the old city

By the mid 19th century, about 15,000 Jews, Muslims and Christians lived in the old city of Jerusalem; about a third of the residents were Jews. Despite the overcrowding conditions, the poverty and filth, the residents of the city were unwilling to leave the holy city. The area around the city was filled with marauders and thieves, as well as wild animals. The gates of the old city were locked at sunset each day and opened only at sunrise, thus protecting the inhabitants of the city.

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Rabbi Kook Museum – Home and Study Hall of Rabbi Kook, the first Ashkenazi chief rabbi of Israel

Abraham Isaac Kook (HaRav Avraham Yitzchak HaCohen Kook, in Hebrew) was born in 1865 in Griva, Latvia. He studied in the Volozhin Yeshiva from the time he was nineteen. At the age of 30, he became the rabbi of Bausk. While being deeply religious, he was a Zionist and a mystic, concerned with the well being of other Jews. In 1904, he came to Ottoman Palestine where he became chief rabbi of Jaffa city. After the First World War, he became the chief rabbi of Jerusalem; two years later he became the first Ashkenazi chief rabbi of British Palestine.

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Chamber of the Holocaust – Jerusalem holocaust museum on Mount Zion

The Chamber of the Holocaust is the oldest museum dedicated to the commemoration of the horrors of the holocaust. This museum was built in 1949 by Holocaust survivors. It is located on Mount Zion, known in Hebrew as Har Tzion, just outside the old city of Jerusalem.

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Gan HaTekuma in the Jewish Quarter – Excavations in Gan HaTekuma

Gan HaTekuma is a park inside the Jewish Quarter of the old city of Jerusalem. Excavations in the park have uncovered remains of three different buildings. The park is located between the Zion Gate and Dung Gate, opposite the main parking lot in the Jewish Quarter.

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Jerusalem Archaeological Park – Davidson Center in Jerusalem’s old city

The Jerusalem Archaeological Park includes the southern section of the western wall as well as the southern retaining wall of the temple mount, in addition to the excavations alongside these walls. The Davidson Center, located in an ancient Umayyad palace, has a museum which provides additional information, displays, and context for the archaeological garden.

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The Wolfson Museum of Jewish Art – Jewish ceremonial art in Jerusalem

The Wolfson Museum of Jewish Art has a collection of antique Jewish artifacts from Jewish communities around the world. These include Chanuka menorahs, miniature models of synagogues made of matchsticks, a display on Jewish holiday customs from various countries, and a display of Jewish ceremonial art for birth and wedding ceremonies.

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Ariel Center of the History of the First Temple Period – museum of first temple period in Jerusalem

The Ariel Center for the History of the First Temple Period has three exhibits.

The first illustrates life in the first temple period. It shows the development the Hebrew characters and writing. This exhibit contains ancient inscriptions from the 7th and 8th centuries BCE. It also shows copies of archaeological findings, such as a plaque engraved with the Priestly blessing, as well as models of a burial cave.

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Museum of Underground Prisoners – Russian Compound Prison

The museum of underground prisoners commemorates the Jewish political prisoners in the time period leading up to the establishment of Israel. These prisoners were active in the Haganah, Lehi (also known as the Stern Group), and Irgun underground groups. The prison depicts the lives of the prisoners and tells their life stories.

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