Tag Archives: modern history

Oz V’Gaon Memorial – Oz Ve’gaon Nature Reserve in Gush Etzion

Oz V’Gaon nature reserve is a memorial for three Israeli youth who were killed by terrorists in the summer of 2014; the kidnapping and murder was one of the events which led up to Operation Protective Edge (Tzuk Eitan, in Hebrew) against Hamas terrorists.

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Abuhav Synagogue in Safed – Sephardi Synagogue with Ancient Torah Scroll

The “Great Synagogue” of Safed was built in the 16th century for the Sephardic Jews of the town. It was destroyed in the earthquake of 1759. Only the ancient torah scroll, which tradition says was written by the 15th century scholar Rabbi Yitzchak Abuhav survived.

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Biriya Fortress in the Galilee – Bnei Akiva and the Palmach built Biriya Fortress

In 1908, Baron Rothschild bought the land for the farmers of Rosh Pina. An attempt to settle the land in 1922 failed; the land was transferred to the JNF. In January of 1945, Palmach members from the Bnei Akiva movement settled the land and built the fortress. In 1946, the British discovered 2 “sliks”, outside the fortress, which were used for hiding weapons. The British evacuated and destroyed the settlement; in their only attempt to erase a Jewish settlement; the settlement became a symbol for the Jews of their determination to settle the land.

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Founders Monument and Fountain – Monument to Tel Aviv’s Founders

The Founders Monument and Fountain is located opposite the home of the first mayor of Tel Aviv, Meir Dizengoff, on 16 Rothschild Boulevard. The historic lottery for the distribution of plots was held on April 11, 1909, on the site. The founders’ monument was planned 40 years later and established in 1951, on Dizengoff’s birthday.

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Memorial for Ethiopian Jews who died en route to Israel – Memorial for Ethiopian Jews on Har Herzl

The Jews of Ethiopia dreamed of coming to Israel for generations. This was finally possible in the early 1980s, although at the risk of their lives. In order to get to Israel, the Ethiopian Jews needed to get to Sudan, where they were airlifted to Israel in Operation Moses in 1984.

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Tel Hai Museum in Israel – Roaring Lion Memorial in Tel Hai – Memorial for Eight Hashomer Guards

The Tel Hai Memorial located in the Upper Galilee in Israel, was built in memory of the eight guards who were killed while defending the Tel Hai settlement. The Museum shows the original buildings and the battle room explains the battle.

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Gan HaMa’ayan in Rishon Lezion – Ein Hakorey Spring – Ma’ayan Shimshon Spring in Rishon le-Tsiyon

Gan HaMa’ayan in Rishon Lezion was where the springs of Rishon Lezion surfaced. The founders of Rishon Lezion, led by Zalman Levontin, called the spring “Ein HaKorey” or “Maayan Shimshon”, from the biblical story in Judges, chapter 15.

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Hannah Senesh Museum in Sdot Yam – Museum in Kibbutz Sdot Yam

Hannah Senesh House is a small museum in Kibbutz Sdot Yam. Hannah Senesh was a young woman who volunteered for a rescue mission and parachuted behind the enemy lines during World War II. She was captured and tortured, but would not betray the cause. She was killed by the Germans in 1944, at the age of 23.

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Yad VaShem Museum Complex – Yad VaShem Holocaust Museum

Yad Vashem is Israel’s official Holocaust Museum. The original museum was established in 1953. The museum complex contains the holocaust history museum, hall of remembrance, museum of holocaust art, children’s memorial, and a research institute. Yad VaShem’s goals include education, documentation, commemoration, and research of the Holocaust.

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Trumpeldor Cemetery in Tel Aviv – Where the founders of Tel Aviv were buried

The Trumpeldor Cemetery in Tel Aviv contains the graves of many of the important historical figures from the last century. The cemetery was founded in 1902, and contains the graves of the founders of Tel Aviv, such as Shimon Rokach and Meir Dizengoff, as well as writers such as Chaim Nachman Bialik and Ehad Ha’am.

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Independence Hall – Meir Dizengoff’s house in Tel Aviv

Independence Hall, located in the home of Tel Aviv mayor Meir Dizengoff, is the site where Israel proclaimed independence in 1948. The hall is arranged as it was on that day, with place cards marking the seating arrangements at the historic event. In addition to the hall, a number of exhibits show the various drafts of the declaration, and a number of additional artifacts related to Israel’s independence.

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Beit HaShomer Museum in Kfar Giladi – Bar Giora and HaShomer Movement

The Beit HaShomer museum is located in Kibbutz Kfar Giladi in the Upper Galilee. The museum tells the history of the Bar Giora underground security organization, which was established in 1907 to guard the Jewish settlements from Arab attackers. Bar-Giora later became the HaShomer movement, which was the precursor to the Israel defense Forces.

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Museum of the History of Eilat – Eilat City Museum

The Eilat museum tells the history of the city of Eilat, highlighting milestones over the years. Photographs and displays in the museum include the ink flag being raised in Eilat after the city was liberated in 1949, the new port being opened along with the Straits of Tiran in 1956, and the peace agreement with Egypt in 1982.

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David Ben-Gurion’s Kibbutz home – Ben Gurion’s house in Sde Boker

David Ben-Gurion was the first prime minister of Israel. When he resigned from the government in 1953, he joined the newly formed Kibbutz Sde Boker in the Negev. He and his wife Paula lived in a simple hut (tsrif in Hebrew), expanded slightly to receive David’s many visitors.

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Etzel Museum in Tel Aviv – Irgun Zvai Leumi Museum in Tel Aviv

Etzel, also known as the Irgun Zvai Leumi, was founded in 1931 by Avraham Tehomi. It is, however, generally associated with Ze’ev Jabotinsky. Jabotinsky explained how Zionism needed a military force, which was used against the British and the Arabs during the fight for an independent Jewish country. The Etzel was also involved in the struggle for free immigration for Jews to Palestine.

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Tel Aviv’s First City Hall – photographs and videos from old Tel Aviv

The Museum of the History of Tel-Aviv-Jaffa is located in the first city hall, known as Beit Ha’Ir. The museum, which opened in the end of 2009, displays photographs collected from the residents of Tel Aviv and old video clips. The office of Meir Dizengoff is also on display inside.

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Shuk Machane Yehuda – Mahane Yehuda Market in Jerusalem

Mahane Yehuda Market, known in Hebrew as Shuk Mahane Yehuda, is the main outdoor fresh food marketplace in Jerusalem. Aside from the fresh fruits and vegetables, bread, cheese, fish, meat, and spices, you can also purchase houseware and clothing. The market has recently attracted some upscale shops and restaurants as well.

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Yarkon National Park – Tel Afek, Antipatris, and the Yarkon River

The Yarkon National Park in located in Rosh Ha’ayin. The park includes Tel Afek and the sources of the Yarkon River. Tel Afek, also known as Antipatris, has an Ottoman fortress. The Yarkon River springs have a variety of flora and fauna.

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Naharayim Memorial – Hill of Picked Flowers in Naharyim

On March 13, 1997, a group of 8th graders from Beit Shemesh were on a class trip to Naharayim Isle of Peace. Jordanian Corporal Ahmed Daqamseh opened fire on the girls, killing seven of them, and wounding an additional six girls before his M-16 rifle jammed and other Jordanian soldiers stopped him.

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Ben Gurion’s Tomb National Park – Ben Gurion’s tomb in Kibbutz Sde Boker

Ben Gurion’s Tomb National Park is located just south of the Sde Boker Kibbutz in the Negev. Paula and David Ben Gurion are buried side by side in the center of the park. The graves are in a well tended park with a stunning view of Nahal Zin from the amphitheater around the graves.

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Atlit Detention Camp – illegal Jewish immigrants to Palestine detained in camp

The Atlit National Monument is a restored British detention camp. The camp was used to detain “illegal” Jewish immigrants who sought refuge in Palestinebefore and after the Holocaust. Thousands of illegal Jewish immigrants were temporarily held there from 1939-1948.

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Rosh HaNikra grottoes – Grottoes and history at Rosh HaNikra

Rosh HaNikra is a chalk mountain range on the Mediterranean Sea, at the Israel-Lebanon border. The white chalk cliffs provide a great view of the Sea and the Galilee. The Sea carved out many grottoes in the soft chalk rock over thousands of years, which have been connected by a man-made tunnel.

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Ammunition Hill Museum and Memorial – Givat HaTachmoshet Museum

Ammunition Hill, known as Givat HaTachmoshet in Hebrew, was the most heavily fortified Jordanian stronghold in 1967. It was also the site of one of the fiercest battles during the six day war. When the Israeli paratroopers captured the hill, the liberation of the old city of Jerusalem was possible.

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Akko Prison – Acre prison for Jewish resistance fighters during the British Mandate

The citadel of Acco was used as a prison during the British Mandate period. The British imprisoned political prisoners in the jail and used the gallows for hanging prisoners. In 1947, twenty seven Jewish prisoners were freed in a jail break at the Akko prison.

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Naharayim Hydroelectricity Station designed by Pinchas Rotenberg – Israel Electric Company’s first power station

Naharayim is best known as the island of peace. In addition to being the site of the signing of the Jordanian-Israeli peace treaty, it is also the site of the first electricity plant built by the Israel Electric Company in the 1920s.

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Old City of Jaffa – Jaffa walking tour – Jaffa galleries

Jaffa, known as Yafo in Hebrew, is an ancient city with a natural harbor which was used as early as the bronze age. The city was ruled by many ancient peoples, including the Egyptians, Caananites, Philistines, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Romans. In the middle ages, it was ruled by the Arabs and the Crusaders.

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Yehiam Fortress National Park – Yehiam crusader fortress protects settlers in 1948

Yehiam Fortress (Mivtzar Yechiam, in Hebrew) National Park is a Crusader fortress in the Galilee. The fortress was destroyed by the Baybars in 1265. The settlers of Kibbutz Yehiam used the fortress walls as protection during the Israeli war of independence.

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Walking tour of Mishkenot Sha’ananim and Yemin Moshe – walking tour outside the old city

By the mid 19th century, about 15,000 Jews, Muslims and Christians lived in the old city of Jerusalem; about a third of the residents were Jews. Despite the overcrowding conditions, the poverty and filth, the residents of the city were unwilling to leave the holy city. The area around the city was filled with marauders and thieves, as well as wild animals. The gates of the old city were locked at sunset each day and opened only at sunrise, thus protecting the inhabitants of the city.

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Rabbi Kook Museum – Home and Study Hall of Rabbi Kook, the first Ashkenazi chief rabbi of Israel

Abraham Isaac Kook (HaRav Avraham Yitzchak HaCohen Kook, in Hebrew) was born in 1865 in Griva, Latvia. He studied in the Volozhin Yeshiva from the time he was nineteen. At the age of 30, he became the rabbi of Bausk. While being deeply religious, he was a Zionist and a mystic, concerned with the well being of other Jews. In 1904, he came to Ottoman Palestine where he became chief rabbi of Jaffa city. After the First World War, he became the chief rabbi of Jerusalem; two years later he became the first Ashkenazi chief rabbi of British Palestine.

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Chamber of the Holocaust – Jerusalem holocaust museum on Mount Zion

The Chamber of the Holocaust is the oldest museum dedicated to the commemoration of the horrors of the holocaust. This museum was built in 1949 by Holocaust survivors. It is located on Mount Zion, known in Hebrew as Har Tzion, just outside the old city of Jerusalem.

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Beit Gidi Etzel Museum – IZL museum – Irgun museum in Tel Aviv

The Beit Gidi Etzel Museum portrays the history of the Etzel movement and its campaigns from the UN resolution on the establishment of a Jewish state until the movement’s dissolution in 1948. The central exhibit is about the battle for Jaffa, and commemorates the 41 Etzel soldiers who fell in the battle.

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National Maritime Museum of Haifa – Maritime history of the Mediterranean Sea

The National Maritime Museum in Haifa is dedicated to the history of the Mediterranean Sea and the ports on the sea. It opened in 1953, with the collection of the museum’s founder Aryeh Ben-Eli. The museum has permanent and temporary exhibits related to 5000 years of seafaring on the Mediterranean.

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HaTachana train station in Tel Aviv – newly renovated old Jaffa train station

HaTachana is the newly renovated old Jaffa train station. HaTachana is a historical spot with exhibits from the old train station, old box cars from the train, and some of the original train tracks. One of the box cars has a display of old pictures, creating a small museum.

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Museum of Underground Prisoners – Russian Compound Prison

The museum of underground prisoners commemorates the Jewish political prisoners in the time period leading up to the establishment of Israel. These prisoners were active in the Haganah, Lehi (also known as the Stern Group), and Irgun underground groups. The prison depicts the lives of the prisoners and tells their life stories.

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